Flash Fiction Friday: The Sock Monster

“The Sock Monster was at it again.” Susan placed a pile of folded laundry on her son’s twin bed, a set of mismatched socks right on top.

“He’s been hungry, lately,” Kyle said. The seven year-old sat crossed legged on his bed, a comic book before him. “Can we get more?”

Susan bent to put some t-shirts in the dresser. “Get more what, hon?”

“Socks. For The Sock Monster.”

“We’re not buying more socks for a fictional character, Kyle.”

“But he’s not fix-chinal—”

“Fictional.”

“Yeah, whatever. He’s not, mom. Mr. Socks is real.”

“Mr. Socks?” Susan hung a pair of jeans in the closet.

“Yep. It’s what I named him. ‘Cause he’s not a monster, he’s—”

“Okay, okay. I get it. You’ve had your fun. Now get ready. We need to hit the store.”

“But what about Mr. Socks? We need to get more socks so—”

“Feed him the leftovers.” She dangled the two mismatched socks in front of Kyle with a smile.

“He doesn’t like eating the same thing every day. It’s boring—”

She headed toward the door. “No socks for something that’s not real.” Then, “Get those shoes on. I mean it.”

Kyle frowned as his mom left. He picked up the odd socks and shuffled to the laundry room. His shoulders slumped as he yanked the dryer door open and tossed them in before shutting it again.

“Sorry, Mr. Socks. This is all I’ve got for you.”

The dryer jerked, then it lunged, then it went still. Kyle opened the door to the dryer. It was empty.

He smiled. At least Mr. Socks wouldn’t go hungry, even if leftovers weren’t his favorite. Then Kyle ran to get his shoes on.

 

©Laura L. Zimmerman 2017

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Book Review: THE STORY OF WITH by Allen Arnold

Well friends, this week I feel compelled to share a book that just might change your life–or at the very least, the way in which you create. A few weeks ago I had the privilege of attending a one-day conference led by Allen Arnold, the author of ‘The Story of With’. Much of his encouraging words came directly from this book, so of course I had to buy it to continue the journey that began that day. During his talk, he made a point of explaining the picture on the front cover of his book, an image that shows the ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi. (Repairing broken pottery with gold lacquer, thereby making it more valuable.)

A week later, I attended a church service where the guest speaker discussed the topic of living in peace in a fallen world. And guess what he used as an example to illustrate his point? You got it! Kintsugi! Since then, I’ve seen a video circulating Facebook where, once again, the beautiful art of Kintsugi is described.

Sounds like God has something to say to me, right? So, I couldn’t let this go without passing along my thoughts on how much Mr. Arnold’s book has meant in my life. Read on for the review! Continue reading